22 February 2011

STUDENT SELF ASSESSMENT: BLOGGING

 This quarter's blogging assignment for my Honors World Lit class was to increase readership.  We discussed a few strategies in class, but I left a lot unsaid because I wanted them to solve this one on their own. Some of them jumped in without looking and were swimming like fish in minutes. Others have had to ruminate on this task and work through their own databanks carefully, to decide what they were willing to do. My only directions were to post once a week and to comment at least once during the quarter on a post from every other person in the class.
 Already, some have adapted my directions to fit their personal styles. You might consider this a positive spin on who is posting on a regular basis and who is watching other people write. I only noted a schedule for posting to make sure they were thinking about this every week. It worked, even if some have posted 7 (!) times and some have posted twice.  Every single student is doing it their own way, regardless of my instructions. WIN.
 I agonized over the assessment: should I tell them what to judge, should I have them write up an assessment of their own? I went for the Middle Way. Below is the link to the questions I am providing them as they review their personal stats (thank you Blogger for adding stats to the Dashboard this year). Considering that I am a verbose writer and speaker, did I say too much? Will  a handout like this cramp their style? What do you think? Thanks.

http://bit.ly/iecruz

2 comments:

Stephanie said...

I have had students blogging for a couple of years now, but I never thought to have them analyze readership in this way.

I think your handout is providing excellent guidance while still leaving plenty of opportunity for the student voice to be heard.

Thanks for giving me this new perspective to consider!

Stephanie said...

I have had students blogging for a couple of years now, but I never thought to have them analyze readership in this way.

I think your handout is providing excellent guidance while still leaving plenty of opportunity for the student voice to be heard.

Thanks for giving me this new perspective to consider!